Monthly Archives: September 2013

Neal’s 59th Birthday

Neal on his 59th birthday
Neal on his 59th birthday

Neal turns 59 this coming Friday.  Mark, Harriet, Susan and Richard had lunch with him at Tao’s, an oriental restaurant in East Longmeadow.  Neal had his favorite food for lunch, lobster, and after lunch, cards and chocolates.  Happy birthday Neal!

Neal, Harriet, Mark and Susan squinting in the sunlight
Neal, Harriet, Mark and Susan squinting in the sunlight

Our website has been renovated!

The software running our old website was installed in 2009 and was becoming difficult to maintain.  For a variety of reasons it could not be updated to a newer version.  Our web hosting service warned me that it was at significant risk for malware and that we needed to fix it soon.  I copied all of the content from the old website and removed the old software, then installed WordPress.  I have been using WordPress on all of my other websites and it is easy to use, maintain and update.  I have finally finished migrating most of the website’s old material to our new setup.

I have known for a while that I would need to completely redo the website and so I am well behind on postings.  I will continue to fine tune the website and will be catching up on postings for a while.  Come back soon to see the new content!

RV Museum, Elkhart, Indiana

Susan at the RV Museum
Susan at the RV Museum

Susan and I have been involved with RV’s for over 10 years.  How could we drive by Elkhart, Indiana and not visit the RV Museum (aka the RV/MH Hall of Fame).  There were a lot of old and unique motor homes and trailers there.  The oldest RV there was a combined Earl Trailer and Model T from 1913.  Many of the early trailers and motor homes were made by individuals and it wasn’t until the 1920’s that any kind of manufacturing got under way. There were some really nifty motor homes and trailers.  There was one from the 1930’s that reminded me of Fuller’s Dymaxion car and one exceptionally elegant one that had a parlor. Even though there were some trailers from a early as the 1920’s that were comparably equipped to our motor home most were really just hard-sided tents that were only occasionally equipped with primitive kitchens.  Bathrooms didn’t become common until the mid-1960’s (agghh!) and air conditioners didn’t become common until the 1980’s.

For us it was a fascinating visit to a museum that in a large sense celebrates our lifestyle. We’d can only give it a C+ for handicap accessibility.  Although the museum floor and bathrooms were wheelchair accessible, none of the trailers and motor homes were and Susan had to rely almost entirely on my descriptions and comments to get an idea what the insides were like.